Saving the World with Design Sprints

Looking at the future — or post-it notes

What’s a Kora?

A Kora is a loyalty point that you earn for being sustainable. Kora’s app helps its users save the world by rewarding sustainable action — biking, walking, recycling, buying organic and local produce and more. Community members are awarded Koras for actions that help improve the ecology, and by extension — the economy.

How could we help?

Meeting over dinner, Gilad told us about Kora’s strategic goals along with the obstacles. With the app soon launching in the App Store, he said, the team needs to amplify its social media presence. That meant getting more followers, engaging existing followers and improving Kora’s overall branding and messaging strategy.

The main Design Sprint objective was to help Kora create a social media messaging framework based on their values, mission and vision.

What is a Design Sprint?

(skip this part if you already know)
A Design Sprint is basically a sequence of goal-oriented exercises aimed at finding, prototyping and testing a solution. A design sprint challenges existing assumptions and poses tough questions — who are we creating this product for? What problem is it solving? Who are our core audience?

Miro board for Koras Design Sprint | Value proposition canva exercise + priority mapping
Final sprint Miro board

Getting started

Kora had a diverse team; Gilad — the founder, Jonathan the Strategist, Eldars the Head of Product and Jamie the social media manager. The team come from Britain, Israel, Canada, Russia, and Latvia, each representing a different culture. During the sprint, they united behind a single goal — achieving their sprint objective.

SPRINT FACTS:
Kora’s core team: 4 people
Design Sprint facilitators: 2 people
Total sessions: 4 (~4hrs per session)
Tools used: Hangouts, Miro app (a digital collaborative board), laptops and the good old pen and paper.

Kora Design Sprint team (left-to-right: Joe, Edijs, Maija, Gilad, Eldars and Ints)
Left-to-right: Joe, Edijs, Maija, Gilad, Eldars and Ints

Day 1 | Values & Mission

We started the sprint by outlining, discussing and agreeing on the company’s core values. As part of the exercise, each team member answered six questions, such as: how would your community describe you? How would you describe your customer? What do you sound like to others?

Kora Design Sprint | Kora's core team busy mapping their company's values
Kora’s busy-bees at work

Kora’s mission is to create a new economy for sustainable living.

Kora Design Sprint | Defining Kora's customer, voice, culture and impact
Defining Kora's customer, voice, culture and impact

Day 2 | Vision

By Day 2, Kora’s team had outlined their core values and mission statement.
They now needed a vision.

Kora’s vision statement is a world that rewards sustainability.‍

Day 2 | Expert feedback

Since it’s impossible for someone to know everything about a company, product or vision, Jake Knapp suggests asking experts. So we did. Over Zoom, we asked Mark and Dan, both longtime friends of Jonathan, for their take on Kora’s mission and vision statements.

Mark and Daniel were the Design Sprint experts, providing an outsider view.
As the team listened to the experts, facilitators took notes and posted them on the board

Day 3 | Value Proposition + Roadmap

Once we had Kora’s core messaging, it was time to turn concepts into action!

Kora Design Sprint | Value Proposition canvas — finding the product-customer fit.
Using value proposition canvas to find the right product-customer fit.
  1. What are the things we need to do to move to the next steps?
  2. What are the things we need to address/ resolve before we’re able to move on to the next step?
  3. What are the positive, enjoyable things that improve our customer experience?
  4. What are the frustrations and annoyances that spoil our customer experiences?
  5. What are the design enhancements that you could implement in a new product (or feature) that addresses any of the problems identified?

Day 4 | Messaging Roadmap

The main design sprint objective was to help Kora create a social media messaging framework. Now that the team had laid a solid foundation — Kora’s vision, mission and vision, we could help with building a messaging framework around those concepts.

Messaging Roadmap(s)
For Kora’s team to implement the sprint results, we first worked on creating individual messaging priorities — which messages were important for each team member. The team then voted and we arranged the messaging priorities into three KPI-based roadmaps: Strategic, Tactical, and General.

Kora’s messaging roadmap later served as the basis for their social media strategy.
Kora’s messaging roadmap later served as the basis for their social media strategy.

Conclusion

The job of a design sprint is to provide teams with a framework for expressing, creating and testing their ideas.

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Idea Partners

Idea Partners

Running Product Design Sprints and UX/UI Bootcamp at ideapartners.co